A general falls. A red monster rises. Stay tuned.

Gabriel Hardman

RULK REPORT : Artist Gabriel Hardman offers insight on why his acclaimed HULK run ended!

Last week on Twitter, artist Gabriel Hardman commented on the possible reason why his critically acclaimed run on the Red HULK comic series ended… as some readers feel… prematurely. 

Here is what he had to say:

“Lately I’ve seen complaints about artists (like me) not staying on comics for longer runs. Thing is, most Marvel books double ship now.

“Double shipping means the book comes out twice a month. It’s not feasible to draw two books a month.

“I would have loved it if the 12 issues of Hulk I drew were consecutive. I’m not in this to draw disconnected parts of ongoing stories.

“Double shipping is just the economic reality of freelance comics right now though, I’m not disputing that.

“Everybody is tweeting Silver Age artists who drew multiple books a month. It’s not a direct comparison.

“Most of them penciled multiple books a month. I pencil and ink my work. There’s also a different expectations for the level of detail now.”

And there you have it.  Will Gabriel Hardman, the best artist to ever draw General Thunderbolt Ross, ever return to the series that brought him so much praise?  Not likely with HULK’s current ship schedule, but maybe he’ll have a story-arc or one-shot left in him just yet.

-A.J. 
A general falls. A red monster rises. Stay tuned.  
Follow the RED HULK BLOG on Twitter @ RedHulkBlog

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RULK HONORS : More accolades for Jeff Parker’s Red HULK !

Comic Book Resources released their annual complete list of the “TOP 100 COMICS OF 2011” yesterday recognizing Jeff Parker’s HULK as the 36th best comic of the year.  While 36th might not sound as prestigious at first glance, it certainly has weight when you consider the HULK was ranked against not only all the other Marvel Comics titles… but the massive catalogs of DC Comics, Image/Top Cow, Boom! Studios, Dark Horse, Oni Press, IDW, Fantagraphics and all the rest.  Here is the write up:

36. Hulk
Written by Jeff Parker
Drawn by Gabriel Hardman
Published by Marvel Comics

“Name another modern day superhero in which the writer works in a moment where the lead character expresses his admiration for George Washington, Ulysses S. Grant, Teddy Roosevelt and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Parker remains one of the strongest writers working at Marvel with the Hulk being his best runs to date.”

— Robot 6 Writer Tim O’Shea

-A.J.
A general falls. A red monster rises. Stay tuned.
Follow the RED HULK BLOG on Twitter @ RedHulkBlog


RULK HONORS : IGN awards the Red HULK Comic Series as one of Marvel’s “Best of 2011” including “Best Art Team”!

As the 2011 year comes to a close, IGN has begun announcing their annual “Best Of” awards for 2011, with none other than the Red Hulk getting some much deserved recognition.  IGN broke down the “ten absolute can’t miss comics” that Marvel had to offer, celebrating Jeff Parker’s HULK series at #6.  Here is the write up:

THE BEST OF MARVEL COMICS 2011

#6 “HULK” –  IGN: “We’ll be honest. We never thought Hulk would bounce back from its first couple of years. And yet, courtesy of Jeff Parker, Gabriel Hardman, and Patch Zircher, Hulk has skyrocketed in quality and entertainment to become one of Marvel’s must-read titles. 2011 saw the introduction of General Fortean, a formidable foe for Thunderbolt Ross with a twist of irony; just as Ross used to hunt down Bruce Banner’s Hulk with ferocity, so too does Fortean hunt the Red Hulk.  Even amidst a Fear Itself tie-in, Hulk stayed its course and managed to be one of the few tie-in books that successfully furthered its own narrative as well as the larger event at hand. With a vast array of intriguing characters, new villains, and downright gorgeous artwork, this is the clear winner of Marvel’s two Hulk titles.”

Now if that wasn’t great news on it’s own, we’re happy to report the talented work of artist Gabriel Hardman and colorist Bettie Breitweiser were awarded as “Best Art Team” of 2011 for all comics (not just Marvel).  Here is the write up:

 BEST ART TEAM 2011

GABRIEL HARDMAN & BETTIE BREITWEISER – IGN:  “Of all the categories, this was the most difficult to nail down a winner for. With so much great comic book art being produced this year, it was a truly tough call. However, the work of Gabriel Hardman and colorist Bettie Breitweiser ultimately placed second to none. Hardman’s explosive page layouts, defining ink work, top-notch storytelling, and devotion to capturing the cinematic qualities of Jeff Parker’s Hulk story combined with the expressive, brilliant color palette of Breitweiser resulted in not only Marvel’s consistently beautiful book, but a shining achievement of superhero art across the board. It’s not easy to make a Hulk book full of emotion and subtlety when your main characters are rage-fueled giants, robots, and aliens. Yet here we are.”

Congratulations to the entire creative team and a big thank you for making a Red Hulk series fans can be proud of!

-A.J.
A general falls. A red monster rises. Stay tuned.
Follow the RED HULK BLOG on Twitter @ RedHulkBlog


ESSENTIAL RULK : Review of HULK Issue # 41

HULK Issue # 41HULK Issue 41 “Omegex 3: Finality” marks the last issue of artist Gabriel Hardman’s run as the penciler on this series.   While he’s incredibly gifted with a classic pulpy style, my relationship with Hardman’s work has been strained at best, specifically when it comes to his incarnation of the Red Hulk.   Drawing him with a stocky, swollen looking frame with a face often greatly lacking in detail, Hardman’s Rulk often looked like one of those giant helium balloons you’d find in a Thanksgiving Day Parade down the streets of New York versus the powerful visual feast past artists have accustomed (maybe even spoiled) fans to.

 

But as the Red Hulk is about to meet his demise at the hands of the cosmic Omegex, this issue reveals it has really nothing to do with the Red Giant and everything to do with the man… Thaddeus E. “Thunderbolt” Ross. So it’s fitting that Hardman’s swan song is an issue that allows him to draw what he draws best: Humans. Unequivocally, Gabriel Hardman draws a wonderful General Ross.   It’s a fantastic artistic rendition, drawn full of heart. 

Ross and Annie

Ross and Annie

 

And Ross is the heart of this issue, the centerpiece of a superbly crafted story written by Jeff Parker that explores the emotional underpinnings of the man within the beast.   As Essential Rulk Issue #23 “Who is the Red Hulk?” masterfully chronicled the life changing events that drove a man down the road to become a monster, this gem of an issue works as a companion piece that explores how the boy became this man.   The results are sad, even poetically tragic, that will spur sympathy towards the long misunderstood hard ass General. 

We finally learn what happens to that mustache!

We finally learn what happens to that mustache!

 

This is a tale that is most difficult to relive by Ross himself, who can no longer hide within his forever cold and hardened shell.   Buried memories so easily exposed by the advanced being Zero-One haunts Thaddeus, yet he proceeds because he realizes all of humanity.. not just his repressed emotional safety.. may be on the line.   So he tries to win Zero-One over for us, knowing he won’t win against the Omegex just like any other challenge he’s faced.   As Zero-One puts it to the Red Hulk… “This is all cyclical. cyclical loss.   You lose to the hulk.   You lose your daughter to him.   Year after year, you lose.”   But thanks to Parker, issue after issue, the readers win.   This one’s essential.   Pick it up.

 

4.5 out of 5 Stars 

-A.J. 
A general falls. A red monster rises. Stay tuned.  
Follow the RED HULK BLOG on Twitter @ RedHulkBlog


RULK REVIEW : HULK Issue # 40

HULK Issue # 40

In HULK Issue #40 “Omegex: Part Two“, writer Jeff Parker spins an unexpectedly interesting tale.   The battle between the two incredible titans Red Hulk and Omegex trumpeted on the cover are never in the forefront, but daringly become the backdrop to something a hundred times more subtle.   All the focus rests on the Red Hulk’s enemy Zero-One and her struggle with her own identity, hinged on finding the answer to a single question that has eluded her purely logical mind:   Was her humanity worth losing?

 

Zero-One’s appearance comes at a time when the Rulk is in grave danger of losing his life.   Onlookers Annie and the Watcher Uravo know it, General Fortean (who joins in on the Omegex’s beat down of the Red Hulk) knows it, and even Ross knows it.   At the hands of the “walking apocalypse“, this may be the Red Hulk’s last stand.   But to understand herself, Zero-One feels she needs to understand the Rulk.   Both her and Ross have clearly evolved to greater beings. Yet, after effectively eliminating all their imperfections, why does the Red Hulk refrain from using his cosmic absorption powers in fear of losing his frail former humanoid self?   Why does he value the weaker state of being?   Why does he value humanity?   This does not compute with Zero-One, so she temporarily pulls Ross out of battle to comprehend his illogical ways.

Omegex has the upper hand

Omegex has the upper hand

 

It’s hard not to admire the risky, yet exceptional story writer Jeff Parker has written in these pages of HULK.   Zero-One’s attempt at comprehending the value of humanity and all its frailties is a tale that feels worthy of a classic Star Trek episode, at its refreshingly best.   Will all fans of the Red Hulk enjoy this type of story? I’m not sure… but it’s brave… and it would be difficult to imagine anyone not feeling moved when the Red Hulk pleads with Zero-One to be released back into battle to save his fallen former friend, while knowing the tremendous price he will pay for it.   And how cool was it finally understand Zero-One’s presence at the Ross family farm in the opening of the previous issue?    Bravo Jeff.

When it comes to the art, this issue highlights artist Gabriel Hardman’s biggest weakness.   While he’s a terrific talent, and his panel layout is creative, battle scenes are just not Hardman’s specialty and it clearly shows. His expertise is definitely more suited for the quieter moments and just doesn’t give the monsters nor their carnage the power they deserve.   It’s like a great pair of shoes that… while they’re extremely well made… just doesn’t quite match the outfit.

 

4 out of 5 Stars 

-A.J. 
A general falls. A red monster rises. Stay tuned.  
Follow the RED HULK BLOG on Twitter @ RedHulkBlog


RULK REVIEW : HULK Issue # 39

HULK Issue # 39In HULK Issue #39 “The Stand-In“, General Thaddeus Ross revisits his past… and shows a side of humanity rarely seen by the man as rigid as the military code of conduct he has so long lived by.
 
It’s all spurred on by the need of finding a new safe base camp, one that his growing arsenal of enemies (M.O.D.O.K., General Fortean, Zero-One, Black Fog) are completely unaware of.   The Red Hulk’s answer to that need is finding refuge in his childhood home, a now rundown and abandoned farm.   As one would expect, upon his arrival, old memories flood the General’s thoughts.   He feels compelled to share, something Annie (his only friend) is more than willing to embrace.   Ross’ tender reminiscing ends abruptly though when the all-powerful cosmic Omegex finally catches up with the Red Hulk and attempts to annihilate the crimson giant once and for all.  
 
Enter the Omegex

Enter the Omegex
 
Writer Jeff Parker delightfully pens a story full of charm as Ross strolls down memory lane.   It’s touching to see the L.M.D. Annie so eager to listen to the tales of a man she is essentially programmed to accompany.   They are clearly fond of each other… Annie so pleased to watch Ross finally enjoying himself… and Ross so apologetic for going on so much about his deceased wife… something one would typically do in concern of offending a new girlfriend.   Is their bond only friendship?   Or is their budding relationship developing into something more?   It’s all a joy to watch unfold.
 
There are some quibbles one could make regarding the logic of the story.   Why would Ross, being so concerned with hiding his identity in an effort to keep his great military record untarnished, select the family Ross home as a hideout?   Isn’t that a place that can easily expose his identity if discovered hiding there?   And the Omegex (who surprisingly doesn’t seem that far removed from a common enemy or deserving of the “walking apocalypse” readers were excitingly teased with) why would the cosmic killer be wasting valuable time hiding is his barn waiting to sneak attack?   Would such a destructive beast concern itself with the element of surprise and wait in the shadows (a tactic more suitable for the likes of Black Fog) after blatantly looking for the Rulk out in the open months before?   Wouldn’t such a creation lock in on his target and drive menacingly forward until grasped?
 
Those problematic details aside, Jeff Parker still more than delivers a great issue as well does artist Gabriel Hardman.  While I’m not a fan of his Red Hulk interpretation, everything else (especially the environment) is drawn extremely well. Hardman’s art always has a classic style that fits very well in an issue filled with flashbacks of our favorite General.
 

4 out of 5 Stars 

-A.J. 
A general falls. A red monster rises. Stay tuned.  
Follow the RED HULK BLOG on Twitter @ RedHulkBlog